Aerospace & Defense

  • May 29, 2024

    FCC Chief Floats Plan To Cut Down On Orbital Satellite Debris

    The Federal Communications Commission's chair proposed new rules Wednesday aiming to reduce the chances of spacecraft explosions that leave debris in orbit.

  • May 29, 2024

    GAO Claims Jurisdiction And Denies Novel AI Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled it had the authority to hear a novel dispute over a company's exclusion from an Army prize competition for artificial intelligence technology because the competition could have eventually led to a contract, but ultimately rejected the protest.

  • May 29, 2024

    Israeli Nanotech Startup, Canadian Biotech Plot US IPOs

    An Israeli nanotech startup launched plans Wednesday for an estimated $75 million U.S. initial public offering, while a Canadian-listed biotechnology company also filed documents to tap U.S. markets, adding to a recent spate of cross-border listings.

  • May 29, 2024

    House Judiciary Leaders Seek Briefing On FISA Court Access

    The top Republican and Democrat on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee are looking for an update on a request by members of Congress for access to the secretive proceedings of the court that hears matters on the controversial warrantless foreign surveillance law.

  • May 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of Doctor's Military Bias Suit

    An Arizona hospital defeated a doctor's discrimination lawsuit for the second time, with the Ninth Circuit upholding an Arizona federal judge's decision to toss the doctor's claims that the hospital showed bias against his military status by not renewing his contract after he deployed.

  • May 29, 2024

    Menendez Trial Judge Sticks With Order Barring Texts

    The federal judge presiding over the corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez announced Wednesday that he is holding firm to his decision barring prosecutors from using text messages to bolster their claims that the New Jersey Democrat took bribes in exchange for authorizing millions of dollars in aid for Egypt.

  • May 28, 2024

    Boeing Jury Urged To Reject Electric Startup's $200M IP Ask

    Counsel for Boeing Co. told a jury to reject Zunum Aero Inc.'s claim it deserves nearly $200 million for alleged trade secrets misappropriation, saying during closing arguments Tuesday that Zunum wants to shift blame away from its own failures.

  • May 28, 2024

    GSA Audit Authority Ruling Bars Crowley Suit Over DOD Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge has rejected Crowley Government Services Inc.'s protest over the terms of a U.S. Transportation Command solicitation for freight services, saying the company effectively attempted to relitigate an already decided dispute over the General Services Administration's audit authority.

  • May 28, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware Court of Chancery watchers shifted their focus last week from the courtroom to Dover's legislative hall, as proposed amendments to Delaware's corporate code were finally introduced to state lawmakers. Hearings, decisions and reversals involved Kraft-Heinz, AMC Entertainment and the merger of cryptocurrency companies BitGo and Galaxy. In case you missed it, here's the latest from Delaware's Chancery Court.  

  • May 28, 2024

    Ex-CIA Officer Admits Sharing Classified Info With China

    A retired CIA agent who most recently worked as a contract linguist for the FBI pleaded guilty Friday in Hawaii federal court to conspiring to collect and share classified U.S. national security information with China, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

  • May 28, 2024

    TransDigm Buys Fellow Aerospace Biz In $655M Cash Deal

    Aerospace company TransDigm Inc., advised by BakerHostetler, on Tuesday unveiled plans to acquire Vedder Price PC-led Raptor Scientific for $655 million in cash.

  • May 28, 2024

    $3.1B Satellite Deal Needs Justices' Review, Co. Says

    A broker accusing Lockheed Martin and Airbus of cutting it from a $3.1 billion military satellite deal opposed the Biden administration's contention that a U.S. Supreme Court review isn't needed, saying the administration incorrectly focused on an underlying F-35 deal.

  • May 28, 2024

    5 Firms To Steer Pair Of Large IPOs That Could Net $1.8B Total

    Private-equity backed hospital billing firm Waystar Holding Corp. and aluminum recycling giant Novelis Inc. on Tuesday launched plans for two initial public offerings that could raise an estimated $1.8 billion combined, guided by five law firms, potentially testing the strength of the IPO market's recovery.

  • May 28, 2024

    Serial Numbers Tie Gold Bars To Menendez, Jury Hears

    The executive assistant of a New Jersey real estate developer on trial alongside U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez linked her boss to some of the gold bars found in the congressman's New Jersey home, confirming Tuesday that the serial numbers of her employer's stash of bars matched the ones stamped on the flashy evidence.

  • May 24, 2024

    Senate Republican Eyes Tutor.com's China Ties, Data Use

    The top Republican on the U.S. Senate's health and education committee has launched an investigation into Tutor.com, a Chinese-controlled web service of The Princeton Review that offers students online tutoring, saying China's Communist Party may be exploiting users' sensitive data.

  • May 24, 2024

    SEC Hits Back At SolarWinds' 'Distortion' Allegations

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sent a letter to a New York federal judge Friday pushing back on SolarWinds Corp.'s accusations that it was overstating and distorting its case against the government contractor over a data hack, saying its complaint is "well-grounded in facts" uncovered during its investigation.

  • May 24, 2024

    Claims Court Won't Toss $1.1M Breach Suit Against Navy

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims won't free the U.S. Navy from a $1.1 million breach-of-contract case from an engineering contractor, saying its handling of indirect and billing rates potentially amounted to a breach.

  • May 24, 2024

    Contractor Entitled To Share In Navy Savings, Board Rules

    The U.S. Navy must share with a construction contractor savings resulting from the contractor's changes to a design-build task order, after the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals ruled the Navy constructively accepted the contractor's proposal for the money-saving changes.

  • May 24, 2024

    GE Immune From Navy Member's Cancer Suit, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit on Friday declined to revive a suit seeking to hold General Electric liable for failing to warn a deceased U.S. Navy veteran about asbestos risks at a government nuclear facility, ruling that derivative sovereign immunity bars the suit's claims.

  • May 24, 2024

    FCC Calls For Fresh Comments On Orbital Debris Rulemaking

    The Federal Communications Commission is hitting the "refresh" button on orbital debris rulemaking, issuing a new call for public input on potential agency rules.

  • May 24, 2024

    Navy Owes Crane Contractor $5M After Refusing Proposed Fix

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals ruled that the U.S. Navy must pay a Konecranes ABP unit roughly $4.9 million after the Navy wrongly refused to accept a proposed fix for problems discovered before delivery of a crane.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs US Immunity Over Marine Recruit's Death

    The Third Circuit has said that "tragedy does not trump sovereign immunity" in a precedential ruling finding that the federal government is immune from a wrongful death suit brought by a U.S. Marine Corps recruit's family after he crashed his car and died on the way to an event for the corps.

  • May 24, 2024

    FCC Probing Unauthorized Navigation Satellite Signals In US

    The Federal Communications Commission is continuing its investigation into U.S. phones receiving unauthorized Russian and Chinese navigation satellite signals, but FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel told lawmakers last week that she didn't have much more to share on the inquiry.

  • May 24, 2024

    NLRB Wants 2nd SpaceX Suit Paused Amid Venue Fight

    The National Labor Relations Board asked a Texas federal judge to pause SpaceX's second challenge to the agency's constitutionality while another federal court deals with a persistent venue dispute in an earlier, nearly identical suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • Contractors Must Prep For FAR Council GHG Emissions Rule

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    With the U.S. Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council expected to finalize its proposed rule on the disclosure of greenhouse gas emissions and climate-related financial risk this year, government contractors should take key steps now to get ready, say Thomas Daley at DLA Piper, Steven Rothstein at the Ceres Accelerator for Sustainable Capital Markets, and John Kostyack at Kostyack Strategies.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • The Effects Of New 10-Year Limitation On Key Sanctions Laws

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    Recently enacted emergency appropriations legislation, doubling the statute of limitations for civil and criminal economic sanctions violations, has significant implications for internal records retention, corporate transaction due diligence and government investigations, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • FEPA Cases Are Natural Fit For DOJ's Fraud Section

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that its Fraud Section would have exclusive jurisdiction over the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act — a new law that criminalizes “demand side” foreign bribery — makes sense, given its experience navigating the political and diplomatic sensitivities of related statutes, say James Koukios and Rachel Davidson Raycraft at MoFo.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Proposed Semiconductor Buy Ban May Rattle Supply Chains

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recent proposed rulemaking clarifies plans to ban government purchases of semiconductors from certain Chinese companies, creating uncertainty around how contractors will be able to adjust supply chains that are already burdened and contracted to capacity, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Patent Lessons From 4 Federal Circuit Reversals In April

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    Four Federal Circuit decisions in April that reversed or vacated underlying rulings provide a number of takeaways, including that obviousness analysis requires a flexible approach, that an invalidity issue of an expired patent can be moot, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • Can Chatbot Interactions Lead To Enforceable Contracts?

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    The recent ruling in Moffatt v. Air Canada that found the airline liable for the representations of its chatbot underscores the question of whether generative artificial intelligence chatbots making and accepting offers can result in creation of binding agreements, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Saying What Needs To Be Said

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that delve into the meaning and effect of contractual releases, and demonstrate the importance of ensuring that releases, as written, do what the parties intend.

  • 4 Takeaways From Biden's Crypto Mining Divestment Order

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    A May 13 executive order prohibiting the acquisition of real estate by a foreign investor on national security grounds — an enforcement first — shows the importance of understanding how the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States might profile cross-border transactions, even those that are non-notified, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Insurer Quota-Sharing Lessons From $112M Bad Faith Verdict

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    In Indiana GRQ v. American Guarantee and Liability Insurance, an Indiana federal jury recently issued a landmark $112 million bad faith verdict, illustrating why insurers must understand the interplay between bad faith law and quota-sharing before entering into these relatively new arrangements, say Jason Reichlyn and Christopher Sakauye at Dykema. 

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

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