Construction

  • February 27, 2024

    Sheppard Mullin Guides $60M Queens Construction Loan

    Sheppard Mullin represented lender Slate Property Group in connection with a $60.25 million construction loan for a mixed-use project in Queens, the law firm told Law360.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds, Fla. Oppose Sharing Power In Clean Water Act Program

    The federal government and Florida are now fighting over how much power each should get after a D.C. federal judge struck down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to approve the Sunshine State's bid to assume authority over a key Clean Water Act permitting program.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gas Groups Press DOE To Restart LNG Export Reviews

    Oil and gas industry groups on Monday urged the U.S. Department of Energy to lift its recent pause of approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the United States, arguing that the move is illegal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Banks Say Brazil Pollution Suit In NY Is In Wrong Country

    Four leading financial institutions are urging a New York federal judge to throw out a pair of proposed class suits accusing them of enabling environmental degradation in Brazil by lending $17.2 million to Brazilian mining company Vale SA, arguing the claims don't belong in the United States because they are "all about Brazil."

  • February 26, 2024

    Caterpillar Owes $12.9M In Wirtgen IP Case, Jury Says

    A federal jury in Delaware has found that Caterpillar owes machinery manufacturer Wirtgen about $12.9 million for infringing five road-milling machine patents, counsel for Wirtgen said.

  • February 26, 2024

    Jury Awards Woodworking Co. $158K Over 'Lemon' Machine

    A Georgia federal jury has found that the manufacturer of a high-tech woodworking machine breached warranty duties to the device's buyer, awarding nearly $160,000 to a Massachusetts business that alleged it was sold a "lemon" of a machine.

  • February 26, 2024

    Estate Correctly Taxed On Insurance Payout, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court should affirm a decision denying a tax refund to the estate of an owner of a building materials company that used a payout from his $3.5 million life insurance policy to purchase his shares in the business, the federal government argued.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Judge Vacates Award For Fund's $40M Liability Claim

    An arbitrator must again review a dispute over a union pension fund's claim that a demolition company owed more than $40 million in withdrawal liability, a Michigan federal judge ruled, vacating the arbitration award because evidence didn't back conclusions about the number of labor contracts involved.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Homeowners Say Toll Bros. Botched Senior Community

    A planned community hit construction firm Toll Brothers with a breach of contract suit in Connecticut state court, alleging 67 townhomes, six apartment buildings and a clubhouse were built or improved with dozens of major defects the builder failed to fix.

  • February 23, 2024

    Wildlife, Paddling Groups Want To Join Clean Water Act Fight

    The National Wildlife Federation and American Whitewater are asking a Louisiana federal judge to let them join litigation over an updated Clean Water Act rule that expanded states' and tribes' ability to block projects such as pipelines and dams over water quality concerns, to ensure their interests are considered.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tribal Biz Atty Must Meet Calif. DA Over Greenhouse Wreckage

    A California federal judge has ordered the lawyer for a business owned by a tribal conglomerate to attend a hearing with San Bernardino County's district attorney, saying the lawyer must explain why he forced the DA to file a unilateral status report about the destruction of illegal cannabis greenhouses.

  • February 23, 2024

    No Lie In Calling A Lemon A Lemon, Jury Told At Trial's End

    At the close of a trial nearly eight years in the making, counsel for a Massachusetts woodworking shop facing claims that it bad-mouthed its machinery suppliers to others in the industry denied claims Friday that the shop's owner-operator leveled death threats during a heated dispute over a malfunctioning piece of equipment.

  • February 23, 2024

    1st Circ. Told Wind Farm's Approval Should've Been A Breeze

    A wind farm developer has asked the First Circuit to reject fishing groups' challenge to the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of a proposed project off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, saying the effort to sink the plan can't survive because the agency did things by the book.

  • February 23, 2024

    Groups Back Texas' Bid To Void Feds' Highway GHG Rule

    Construction trade groups have thrown their support behind the state of Texas' federal lawsuit seeking to vacate a new U.S. Department of Transportation rule requiring states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • February 23, 2024

    Denver Jury Awards Aecom $5M In Toll Lanes Fight

    A Denver federal jury awarded construction design firm Aecom $5.25 million in damages Friday for a subcontractor's failure to pay for design services for a Colorado highway expansion, and rejected the subcontractor's attempt to get $260 million in counterclaims.

  • February 23, 2024

    With Interest, Trump Now Owes $454M For NY Valuation Fraud

    Donald Trump owes New York state nearly a half billion dollars after a county clerk on Friday tacked on $99 million in interest linked to a $355 million judgment in the state attorney general's civil fraud case against the former president last week.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Metals Co. Exec Says He Was Denied Promised Bonuses

    A former vice president for finance and administration at a Pennsylvania metals company told a state court that he was promised yearly performance-based bonuses of about $20,000, but was thwarted by the company's lack of goals and its claim that it wasn't performing well enough even as other employees got bonuses.

  • February 23, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Tesco target competing retailer Lidl with a copyright claim as they battle in the Court of Appeal over the design of Tesco’s Clubcard, the directors of a taxi business sue the creator of an AI route mapping app for professional negligence, Global Aerospace Underwriting Managers tackle an aviation claim by an Irish investment company, and Robert Bull hit with a general commercial contracts claim by Hancock Finance.

  • February 22, 2024

    Aviation Services Co. Seeks OK Of $5M Niger Award

    An aviation company incorporated in Luxembourg has asked a D.C. federal court to confirm a final arbitral award of €4.8 million, approximately $5 million, stemming from the Republic of Niger's expropriation of a ground handling services enterprise in which the company has invested.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Say Russian Citizens Laundered Cash With Fla. Condos

    Federal officials in South Florida announced Thursday that they have initiated forfeiture proceedings against two condominium units located in Miami, saying that they're owned by a pair of Russians who were prohibited from owning U.S. property due to the 2014 invasion of Crimea in Ukraine.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Offshore Wind Project Gets Final Green Light From Feds

    The Biden administration said Thursday it has approved the Empire Wind offshore wind energy project's construction and operations plan, clearing the way for construction of two wind facilities off the coast of Long Island, New York.

  • February 22, 2024

    Vidal Gives New Life To Roof Estimator IP Fight

    The head of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has thrown out a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision that found that none of the challenged claims in an EagleView Technologies Inc. patent for aerial roof estimation were invalid.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. Embezzler Gets 2 Years For $1M Mom-And-Pop Ripoff

    The former office manager for a family-owned construction business in Connecticut must serve 24 months in prison for stealing nearly $1 million from her employer through a yearslong embezzlement scheme and failing to pay taxes on the money, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    EPA Puts $5.8B On Tap For Water Infrastructure Projects

    The Biden administration said it's making $5.8 billion available to help pay for water projects around the U.S., steering millions of dollars to states and territories to help overhaul drinking water infrastructure, and wastewater and stormwater systems.

  • February 22, 2024

    Harris County Cites 'Major Flaw' In Agency's Concrete Permits

    Harris County on Thursday announced it was suing the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality over January amendments to permitting requirements for concrete plants, writing that while the regulations could improve air quality for Houston residents, the agency added a "major flaw" by giving plants up to 10 years to comply.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: The Terms Matter

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    Stephanie Magnell and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth examine recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which offer reminders about the importance of including contract terms to address the unexpected circumstances that may interfere with performance.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

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