Intellectual Property

  • March 28, 2024

    Judge Throws Out IP Suit, Citing Expired 3D Glasses Patent

    A federal judge in Houston has tossed a lawsuit brought by a prolific patent litigator on behalf of VDPP LLC, holding that the patent covering 3D glasses had expired before the complaint was anywhere near a courthouse.

  • March 28, 2024

    10th Circ. Vacates Netflix Fee Award In 'Tiger King' IP Row

    The Tenth Circuit on Thursday vacated an attorney fee award for Netflix in a copyright suit brought by a zoo employee whose footage was used in the show "Tiger King," just one day after the circuit court widely upheld the streaming giant's summary judgment win.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Stop Sales Of Heart Valve Testers

    The Federal Circuit held Thursday that a California federal judge wasn't wrong to deny an injunction request after declaring that a "substantial question of validity" had been raised over a patent covering a way of testing the durability of a heart valve.

  • March 28, 2024

    Special Master Suggests Denying Bid To Toss Gaming IP Row

    A special master in the Northern District of Georgia has recommended denying an attempt to throw out patent infringement and trade secret claims that New York-based sports tech company Vetnos LLC has lodged against Atlanta-based rival PrizePicks.

  • March 28, 2024

    ITC Judge Recommends General Exclusion In Wallet IP Case

    A U.S. International Trade Commission judge has found that a pair of Chinese companies flouted U.S. law by importing certain types of wallets, saying the imports should be banned.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fitness Firm Wants TTAB To Ax Mountain Bike Co.'s TMs

    Workout products company Rogue Fitness has urged an Ohio federal judge to make the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office cancel a mountain bike seller's registration for its "Rogue Ridge" mark, arguing the USPTO's internal appeals board wrongly refused to do so when the fitness company objected.

  • March 28, 2024

    4 Takeaways As Hollywood Asks For AI Deepfakes Laws

    Deepfakes have ceased to live solely in the world of science fiction, and their proliferation has already presented disturbing examples of a distorted reality — from phony robocalls by politicians to bogus celebrity nudes.

  • March 28, 2024

    Pfizer Wants Moderna Vax IP Case Paused For PTAB Review

    Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE have asked a Massachusetts federal court to put on hold a COVID-19 vaccine patent case brought by rival biotechnology giant Moderna Inc. while they await a decision from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board on the validity of two of the three patents at issue.

  • March 28, 2024

    Jury Gives Cameron $9M Win In Fracking Patent Fight

    A Texas federal jury has handed Cameron International Corp. a $9 million award after finding that Nitro Fluids LLC willfully infringed two of its patents covering aspects of certain fracking systems used in oil and gas production.

  • March 28, 2024

    NBA Pro Antetokounmpo Lays Suit Against Bed-Maker To Rest

    NBA superstar Giannis Antetokounmpo has dropped his Wisconsin federal court lawsuit against luxury bed-maker Maree Inc., which he had accused of fraudulently scheming to mislead customers into thinking he had endorsed its products when he had not.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fees Awarded For 'Feeble' Milk Vitamin Eligibility Argument

    A Delaware federal judge has ordered ChromaDex Inc. and Dartmouth College to pay attorney fees to Elysium Health for making a "feeble" and failed argument defending their milk vitamin patents from an eligibility challenge, saying he's rarely been more confident that a suit was unreasonable.

  • March 28, 2024

    Commerce Adds Export Admin Roles To Boost Nat'l Security

    The U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security is adding two new deputy assistant secretaries for export administration as part of a modernization drive to meet its growing national security role, the assistant secretary announced Thursday.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Calls For Injunction Amid Online Harassment

    A former Greenberg Traurig LLP patent attorney locked in litigation in Florida federal court with a social media influencer over claims the influencer mounted a campaign to get him fired and destroyed his reputation reiterated his request for a cyberstalking injunction Thursday as he detailed disturbing recent instances of online harassment he has received.

  • March 28, 2024

    NC Atty Calls Airline Mogul's Bank Records Request 'Reckless'

    A North Carolina attorney has asked a federal court to snuff a request by an airline tycoon to dig into the attorney's banking records as part of a hacking conspiracy lawsuit, arguing the request is an overbroad, "reckless" grab at irrelevant information.

  • March 28, 2024

    'Better Made' Chips Goes After 'Better Smoke' Pot

    Detroit-based Better Made Snack Foods Inc. said a number of cannabis companies in Michigan have been selling a line of "Better Smoke" cannabis products that mimics the snack brand's century-old logo in a trademark infringement lawsuit filed Wednesday.

  • March 28, 2024

    NBCUniversal, DeLorean Settle 'Back To The Future' TM Suit

    NBCUniversal Media LLC has settled a trademark infringement suit over royalty payments for its use of the iconic DeLorean DMC-12 sports car on "Back to the Future" merchandise, according to a notice filed Tuesday in California federal court.

  • March 28, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen investors target fraudsters who ran a fake film tax scheme, Barclays Bank sue privately owned Russian bank PJSC Sovcombank, easyGroup bring a trademark infringement claim against online casino TGI Entertainment for its "easybet" word sign, and a bioethanol fuel company hit high-profile individuals connected to the collapsed Elysian Fuels scheme. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 27, 2024

    Kim Kardashian Accused Of Touting Fake Donald Judd Tables

    Kim Kardashian bought knockoff Donald Judd tables and chairs for her Skkn By Kim office space and then touted the furniture in a video to her 2 million YouTube subscribers as authentic pieces designed by the late artist, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • March 27, 2024

    Warner Bros. Beats Claim It Stole Idea For 2022 'Batman' Film

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday granted Warner Bros. and DC Comics separate wins in a suit accusing the entertainment giants of stealing a comic book artist's story idea for the 2022 movie "The Batman," finding it was actually the artist who exploited the Batman universe.

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge-Shopping Guidance Unlikely To Affect Patent Hot Spots

    Recent guidance by the policymaking body for U.S. courts aimed at deterring "judge shopping" likely won't disrupt patent cases in Texas, experts say, since the suggestions are not mandatory and can be viewed as already being in place in popular patent districts.

  • March 27, 2024

    TikTok Star Ordered To Pay $805K To Sony For Sampling Song

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday ordered TikTok musician Trefuego to pay Sony Music Entertainment Inc. more than $805,000 for illegally sampling its licensed song "Reflections," but he denied Sony's bid for an injunction.

  • March 27, 2024

    ITC Judge Recommends Exclusion Order In Tourniquet IP Row

    A U.S. International Trade Commission administrative judge has recommended the commission order that imports of products related to blood flow restriction be banned, handing a win to a pair of American medical product manufacturers.

  • March 27, 2024

    Citing Warhol, 10th Circ. Undoes Netflix's 'Tiger King' Win

    The Tenth Circuit on Wednesday relied on last year's landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the Warhol case to set aside a fair use win for Netflix Inc. in a copyright suit brought by a former zoo employee who livestreamed the funeral of the husband of "Tiger King" star Joe Exotic.

  • March 27, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Faulty Jury Directions Warrant New IP Trial

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday granted Inline Plastics Corp. another chance to convince a Massachusetts federal jury that its tamper-resistant plastic containers were too successful for the underlying patents to be invalidated as obvious.

  • March 27, 2024

    Pool Co. Says Objection To Trial Attys Leaving Is 'Misplaced'

    A swimming pool equipment maker has hit back at objections to some of its counsel exiting the case after a nearly $15 million trial loss over false ad claims in North Carolina, saying its rival's grievances are "misplaced."

Expert Analysis

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

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    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • Key Considerations For Evaluating An AI Vendor

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    As artificial intelligence technology advances across industries, businesses can mitigate risks, while maximizing the value of their investment, by evaluating technology, expertise, support services, transparency and more when selecting an AI vendor, say Rahul Kapoor and Shokoh Yaghoubi at Morgan Lewis.

  • Exploring The Foreign Discovery Trend In Delaware

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    Despite a U.S. Supreme Court decision limiting the use of Section 1782, recent trends from a Delaware federal court suggest that Delaware remains an appealing forum for such foreign discovery requests, says Florentina Field at Abrams & Bayliss.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

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    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Expediting Psychedelics Approvals In The EU, UK, Australia

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    Accelerated pathways for regulatory approvals for psychedelic drugs in the European Union, U.K. and Australia is indispensable to facilitate a seamless advancement of treatments from the research environment to the consumer, say Kimberly Chew at Husch Blackwell, and Ana Dukic and Sabrina Ramkellawan at AxialBridge.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Opinion

    Vidal Should Amend USPTO Precedent In Automaker Review

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    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal's recent decision to review Ford and Honda patent challenges that were rejected by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board provides an opportunity to revisit precedents that have unfairly denied companies a fair review process and align them with commonsense principles of legal equity, says former Sen. Patrick Leahy.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

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