Massachusetts

  • February 27, 2024

    Mass. AG Sues Boston Suburb For Flouting Housing Law

    Massachusetts Attorney General Andrea Joy Campbell is seeking an injunction, fines or possibly the appointment of a special master to force the Boston suburb of Milton to comply with a state housing law requiring multifamily zoning that the town's voters rejected in a referendum earlier this month, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Cybersecurity Firm Says Reseller Stiffed It To Pay Other Bills

    Cybersecurity firm Acronis Inc. is accusing a reseller of using the proceeds from the sale of its products to pay off other financial obligations and ignoring its $1.5 million debt to Acronis, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Massachusetts state court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    'Pig Butchering' Victim Slaps Binance, Ex-CEO With RICO Suit

    Binance and the cryptocurrency exchange's former CEO let criminal syndicates run fraud schemes through its platform by flouting laws against money laundering and money transmitting, according to an $8.1 million civil racketeering suit filed in Boston federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Boston Sued For Records Of White Supremacist Protest

    The city of Boston and two law enforcement agencies are flouting the state's public records laws to avoid scrutiny over what one expert called an "intelligence failure of significant proportions" during a march by an avowed white supremacist group in 2022, a lawsuit filed Monday by the National Lawyers Guild alleges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mass. Judge Won't Rethink SEC Win On Adviser Duty Breach

    A Massachusetts federal judge has refused to reconsider a judgment against Commonwealth Financial Network that found it failed to disclose an arrangement with its clearing firm that favored certain mutual funds to investors, saying the company has not identified any new evidence or an error in the court's application of the law.

  • February 26, 2024

    Boston Moves To Settle Suit Over 2016 Police Shooting

    The city of Boston has reached an agreement in principle to settle a wrongful death lawsuit brought by the mother of a Black man who was shot to death by Boston police officers in 2016, according to a Monday filing.

  • February 26, 2024

    JetBlue, Spirit Tell 1st Circ. $3.8B Deal Is Good For Most Fliers

    JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines told the First Circuit on Monday that a $3.8 billion merger should not have been blocked because the judge who stopped the sale sought to protect a small, hypothetical subset of travelers to the detriment of the vast majority who stand to benefit from the deal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teva Tells 1st Circ. Feds Must Clear High Bar In FCA Case

    Teva Pharmaceuticals told the First Circuit on Monday that the federal government should be held to — and cannot meet — a strict causation standard in a False Claims Act kickback case, asking the court to settle a matter of first impression in the circuit.

  • February 26, 2024

    Liberty Cuts Off Drivers' Rentals Too Soon, Suit Claims

    Liberty Mutual systematically and arbitrarily ends replacement transportation coverage after seven days for policyholders whose vehicles are totaled in collisions, in violation of its own policy language, a proposed class action alleges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mass. Casino Gets 2nd Fine For Taking Illegal College Bets

    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission on Monday fined Encore Boston Harbor $40,000 for improperly taking bets on games involving in-state colleges, the second such punishment doled out to the casino in the past seven months.

  • February 26, 2024

    Murder, Robbery Exoneree Seeks $1M For Lost Years

    A Massachusetts man who spent more than half his life in prison before being exonerated for a 1994 murder and robbery has filed a lawsuit seeking $1 million in compensation under a 20-year-old state law.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ropes & Gray-Led THL Taking Agiliti Private In $2.5B Deal

    Medical equipment management company Agiliti is going private in a deal with private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners, Agiliti announced Monday.

  • February 26, 2024

    Jury Awards Woodworking Co. $158K Over 'Lemon' Machine

    A Georgia federal jury has found that the manufacturer of a high-tech woodworking machine breached warranty duties to the device's buyer, awarding nearly $160,000 to a Massachusetts business that alleged it was sold a "lemon" of a machine.

  • February 26, 2024

    1st Circ. Rejects Crypto Founder's Hollow Fraud Appeal

    A cryptocurrency founder convicted of fraud hitched his appeal to "inapplicable precedent" and failed to muster an argument why a judge's blocking of testimony from government witnesses deprived his defense of material and favorable evidence, the First Circuit said in upholding the guilty verdict.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    No Lie In Calling A Lemon A Lemon, Jury Told At Trial's End

    At the close of a trial nearly eight years in the making, counsel for a Massachusetts woodworking shop facing claims that it bad-mouthed its machinery suppliers to others in the industry denied claims Friday that the shop's owner-operator leveled death threats during a heated dispute over a malfunctioning piece of equipment.

  • February 23, 2024

    Gov.'s Romantic Ties To Top Court Pick May Spark Recusals

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's selection of a former romantic partner to serve on the state's Supreme Judicial Court could be grounds for the justice to recuse herself from certain cases, though those scenarios would be relatively rare, legal ethics experts told Law360.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mass. Ruling Seen As 'Sea Change' In Young Adult Sentencing

    A first-of-its-kind ruling by Massachusetts’ top appeals court recently declared sentences of life without parole for anyone under 21 to be unconstitutional, and advocates say the decision and the science backing it up could provide a road map for young adult sentencing reform nationwide.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tobacco Cos. Look To Nix COPD Suit Decades After Diagnosis

    Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris asked a Massachusetts state judge on Friday to end a wrongful death lawsuit brought decades after a woman's COPD diagnosis and nearly three years after her death, pointing to a state high court ruling last summer that affirmed strict time limits for such claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    WilmerHale Scores Win For Hearing Impaired Mass. Prisoners

    After an eight-year legal fight, WilmerHale and several nonprofit legal advocacy organizations recently won a major ruling from a federal judge to help change how deaf and hard-of-hearing Massachusetts prisoners receive emergency notifications and other announcements.

  • February 23, 2024

    J&J Unit Assails Knee Replacement IP Verdict At Fed. Circ.

    Johnson & Johnson subsidiary DePuy Synthes wants the Federal Circuit to undo a $20 million jury verdict against it for infringing an orthopedic surgeon's knee replacement patent.

  • February 23, 2024

    Balloon Co. Blew Up Appeal Of Fraud Verdict, 1st Circ. Says

    A bid from the owner of a defunct balloon company to set aside an already-reduced jury award won't fly, the First Circuit has concluded, finding that the company's own acknowledgment about transferred funds "dooms their appeal."

  • February 23, 2024

    1st Circ. Told Wind Farm's Approval Should've Been A Breeze

    A wind farm developer has asked the First Circuit to reject fishing groups' challenge to the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of a proposed project off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, saying the effort to sink the plan can't survive because the agency did things by the book.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Debt Collector Compliance Takeaways From An FDCPA Appeal

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    A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau amicus brief last month in an ongoing First Circuit appeal focusing on an interpretation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act can serve as a reminder for debt collectors to understand how their technologies, like bankruptcy scrubs and letter logic, can prevent litigation, says Justin Bradley at Womble Bond.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • How Biotech Deals May Help Competition, Despite FTC View

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    The Federal Trade Commission's complaint against Sanofi's proposed partnership with Maze Therapeutics highlights increasing skepticism of so-called killer acquisitions, but a closer look reveals potentially legitimate reasons behind why entities might decide to delay or abandon the development of acquired products, say consultants at Analysis Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

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