Washington

  • February 26, 2024

    Amazon Loses Round In Suit Over Subscription Renewals

    Amazon must face claims in a proposed class action that its automatic renewal for Prime, Kindle and other services violates California and Oregon consumer laws, according to a Washington federal judge who said Monday that it was unclear if the retail giant did enough to make it easy to cancel after a free trial.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    EPA Must Act On Failed Skagit River Temps Plan, Tribe Says

    The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community said it plans to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Endangered Species Act violations unless it revisits a failed Washington state plan to address high water temperatures in the Lower Skagit River Basin that are harming protected salmon species.

  • February 26, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Freshub Didn't Lie To Revive Patent App

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld a Texas federal court's ruling that Amazon's Alexa voice assistant didn't infringe voice-processing system patents owned by Freshub and that Freshub didn't use nefarious means to obtain those patents.

  • February 26, 2024

    Don't Nix Cash App Referral Text Suit, Consumer Says

    Cellphone users alleging mobile payment service Cash App bombarded them with "annoying and harassing spam texts" have told a Seattle federal judge that Cash App's parent company shouldn't be allowed to escape their suit, pointing to recent and "nearly identical" claims against trading app Robinhood that survived a dismissal bid and subsequently settled for a proposed $9 million.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Horse Owner's Civil Rights Suit Over Name

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday reinstated Jerry Jamgotchian's constitutional challenge against the California Horse Racing Board's decision refusing to let his horse Malpractice Meuser compete in a race in 2022, noting that the board's decision didn't block Jamgotchian from pursuing constitutional claims in federal court since the board lacked jurisdiction to decide such claims.

  • February 26, 2024

    Timeshare Settlement Can't Stop Additional Consumer Suit

    A Washington marketing firm must face negligent misrepresentation and consumer protection claims over links to a timeshare-exit company, according to a Washington federal judge who ruled that a group of consumers seeking refunds are not barred from suing because of a settlement in another case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Hydroelectric Co. Asks For Pause On Puyallup Dam Order

    A hydroelectric company appealing to the Ninth Circuit is asking a Washington federal judge to stay an order that directed it to remove part of a temporary rock dam on the Puyallup River, saying the order would require it to make changes that are likely to damage its facility.

  • February 26, 2024

    Wash. Atty Disbarred Over Unrefunded Client Fees

    A Washington employment attorney who collected tens of thousands of dollars in fees from numerous clients whose legal work she never completed has been forced to give up her law license.

  • February 26, 2024

    Supreme Court Won't Hear Appeal Of Calif. Honking Law

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday opted not to take up an appeal challenging a California law banning people from honking car horns except to warn others, leaving the ban in place.

  • February 26, 2024

    FTC Challenges Kroger's $25B Albertsons Buy

    The Federal Trade Commission announced a new, national front Monday against Kroger's heavily criticized $24.6 billion purchase of fellow grocery store giant Albertsons, challenging a deal it said threatens both shoppers and workers and cannot be saved by the planned divestiture of a "hodgepodge" of hundreds of stores.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Amazon Pays $1.9M To Abused Workers In Saudi Arabia

    Amazon has paid $1.9 million to over 700 migrant workers who suffered human rights abuses at two of its warehouses in Saudi Arabia, the company said.

  • February 23, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Gets Facebook Browser Tracking Suit Tossed

    A Washington state judge sided with Seattle Children's Hospital on Friday, throwing out a proposed class action accusing the healthcare provider of privacy law violations and agreeing the group of parents hadn't shown how the use of a browser tracking tool on its website disclosed confidential patient information to Facebook.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Asylum Rightly Denied Over UK Assault Record

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday ruled that a noncitizen was ineligible for asylum, finding reliable the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's evidence that he had sexually assaulted minors while living in the United Kingdom.

  • February 23, 2024

    Idaho Blasts 'Abortion Mandate' In High Court State Ban Fight

    The Idaho attorney general has accused the federal government of transforming an emergency medical care law into an "abortion mandate" in a U.S. Supreme Court case pitting the state's criminal ban against the Biden administration's efforts to maintain abortion access post-Dobbs.

  • February 23, 2024

    Binance Judge Says Greed Overtook Ethics, OKs $4.3B Plea

    A Washington federal judge signed off Friday on Binance's $4.3 billion plea deal on money laundering and bank fraud charges, saying from the bench that the cryptocurrency exchange's ethics violations could not be explained away by mere ignorance. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds Back ICE Contractor In 9th Circ. Detainee Wage Fight

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that immigrant detainees at contractor-run facilities aren't covered by state labor laws, backing GEO Group Inc.'s effort to overturn $23.2 million in judgments that found a detainee work program violated Washington's minimum wage law.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Upholds NLRB's Refusal To Bargain Order

    A Los Angeles restaurant illegally refused to bargain with a UNITE HERE local, the Ninth Circuit ruled, supporting the National Labor Relations Board's determination that the company couldn't avoid liability for a federal labor law violation by raising the COVID-19 pandemic as an excuse.

  • February 23, 2024

    Quinn Emanuel Wins Bid To Lead Amazon Returns Case

    A Washington federal judge has tapped Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP to serve as interim class counsel in a proposed class action against Amazon regarding its return policies.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Rethink Tossed Google $2B Ad Trespass Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that it will not reconsider its decision to toss a proposed $2 billion class action against Google that claimed the ubiquitous search engine enriched itself through unauthorized advertising that trampled website owners' property.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. Tribe Awarded Land Comp Funds After 50-Year Battle

    In a decision the Chinook Indian Nation on Thursday called groundbreaking for other Indigenous communities, the federal government determined that the tribe will receive more than $48,000 from an Indian Claims Commission judgment handed down half a century ago as compensation for the seizure of the tribe's ancestral lands.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Seeks $1.2M In Damages For Debt Collector's Errors

    A debt collection company should pay more than $1.2 million after it "didn't even come close to complying with the law" while recovering medical debt payments for a hospital in Washington, the state attorney general's office told a judge during a bench trial Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Game Maker Deserves Sanctions For Sealed Docs, Court Told

    High 5 Games and its attorneys should be slapped with sanctions for repeatedly trying to seal nearly all company records and filing overly long court briefs in a class action accusing the casino phone game developer of defrauding players, according to a motion filed by the lead plaintiff.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Ore. Insurance Ruling Opens Door To Extracontractual Claims

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    The Oregon Supreme Court's recent Moody v. Oregon Community Credit Union decision expanding an insurer's potential liability when adjusting life insurance policies exposes insurers to extracontractual tort liability, and the boundaries of this application will likely be tested through aggressive legal action, says Tessan Wess at GRSM50.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

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